Break-In Alert

On April 28 (Thursday) Two homeowners in the 2200 block of Brigden Road came home about 5 p.m. to find their houses broken into and ransacked.

A witness said it appeared two young girls were going door-to-door to see if anyone was home.  They rang the doorbell and stayed around longer than someone might have if it was apparent no one was home.

The homes were later broken into. The thieves stayed in the houses quite awhile. Jewelry was taken. Drawers were taken out and the contents scattered throughout the houses. Shaving cream and glue were used to ruin laptops. Paint was sprayed throughout the houses and on big screens. In one house, the thieves used a kitchen knife to rip apart all the upholstered furniture.  Knives were stuck into the walls.

Both houses appear to have been broken into at a rear window using a screw driver.

At one house, clues were left that may lead to the burglars.

The police theorize that the thieves are not from this area, but were looking for opportunities.

It should be noted that seems to be a pattern in the string of houses where the burglaries occurred — one house with a dog outside but no car in the driveway; one without a dog or car in the driveway — broken into; a house with a dog and car; a house with a car in the driveway; a house with no car but a dog outside; a house without a dog or car in drive — broken into.

Burglars don’t want to chance breaking into a house with a car in the drive, or a barking dog.

The police also recommend considering alarm systems.  Again, thieves don’t want to take a chance.

The poor economy is forcing more people to steal.

A reminder:  If you see someone like the two girls mentioned, PLEASE get involved.  Call the police non-emergency number immediately.  If this had been done, perhaps these burglaries could have been avoided.

We must watch out for our neighbors or we may come home to find the mess and thousands of dollars worth of damage that happened today.

Donn Dufford
President

Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Assn.

We had a residential burglary in Brigden Ranch on March 8, 2011.

A house in the 2200 block of Woodlyn near Martelo was broken into.

Normally there are cars in the driveway of this house and the one next door, but not today. This was probably a crime of opportunity. The burglars may have walked down the street until they found empty driveways and figured no one was home. Our neighbors left the house only between 10:30 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. When they returned, they found a rear door screen torn, a door window broken and the door wide open. Also, there was obvious of attempted break in using a screw driver at another door and a couple windows.

Our neighbors reported the burglars took a laptop, and jewelry, including costume jewelry and some pieces with special meaning. The police could not find fingerprints, probably because of the helpful hints given to burglars by CSI and other police shows.

The police have said these crimes of opportunity have increased because of the poor economy. This means we must be more vigilant.

Know your neighbors and what their routines are. Consider telling them when you plan to be away and if you’re expecting anyone like workers.

Leave a car in the driveway, a radio on inside, and lock your doors and windows.

Report suspicious activity to the police non-emergency line, including door-to-door solicitors. And don’t open your door if you don’t know the person outside.

Make sure your wi-fi systems are password protected. Be aware that your signal may be picked up several houses away.

We still have a very safe neighborhood compared with other areas of Pasadena. BUT, don’t take chances. We obviously have thieves prowling our neighborhood looking for easy money. Let’s not give it to them.

Donn Dufford
President
Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Association

One of our homeowners in the 1900 block of Brigden was approached by a black male and white female around 7 p.m. tonight. The couple had an ADT security sign and told the homeowner he could get a free security system if he put the sign on his lawn.

Our neighbor said no and the couple left. But upon checking, our neighbor found his neighbors were NOT contacted by the couple.

Every few months we do have a security company come through Brigden Ranch offering free service. Whether this is legitimate isn’t known. Whether the couple was casing the neighborhood isn’t known. Our neighbor called me and I asked him to alert the police. If the police have a patrol car available, they’ll send in through the neighborhood.

The police have told us crimes like burglary are increasing because of the economic downturn. Just because Brigden Ranch hasn’t been hit hard doesn’t mean we should let our guards down.

Be alert.

This does bring up the point that security systems DO help prevent burglaries. When a burglar sees a Protection One, ADT or other security sign and stickers on windows, they usually will pass that house by. Speaking from experience we avoided a burglary in another house we own by having Protection One service. I know this works.

Donn Dufford
BRNA President

Be sure to vote March 8. Who leads your City and school district is important.

You are invited to the Grand Opening of the Allen-Brigden Classics, 5:30-7 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 29 at the site, 1142 N. Allen (at Brigden).

A brief ceremony is planned for 6 p.m., with the project open to the public.

It has been a long journey, but the end product is one that fits Brigden Ranch and is a great gateway to our neighborhood.

That journey began five years ago when your Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Association discovered the old gas station, closed for about 30 years, was going to be replaced by a large three-story box of condominiums that would be out of place in our neighborhood. Our efforts convinced the City to buy back the property from the developer and go with a smaller, more appropriate and more attractive project. Allen-Brigden Classics consists of four condominium units that were quickly sold to first-time, moderate-income buyers who will receive financial assistance from the City of Pasadena. As was intended, all four buyers work and live in Pasadena.

The other two units are work/live spaces designed for home-based business owners. No retail or traffic-producing businesses will be allowed.

The developer is Trademark Development of Pasadena, which has been extremely open and accommodating to Brigden Ranch and our neighbors. Unlike the planned first project, the current design by architect Tyler/Gonzalez Associates is tasteful and fits the architecture and colors found on Brigden Road.

The following Brigden Ranch residents are to be thanked and commended for spending hundreds of hours collecting neighbor signatures against the initial project, meeting with the City Council and our council member to pursue alternatives, studying zoning and planning regulations and reviewing them with the City’s Planning and Zoning departments, discussing concerns and desires with the developer, and much more.

Thanks to Liane Enkelis, Julia LaGrua, Stacy Lewis, Armand Montiel, Monica Villegas, and Augustin Zuniga for laying the foundation for this successful project. And especially to the late Henry Sherrod, who took on the job of totally understanding Pasadena’s zoning and planning regulations, without which, the welcome new project would not have been built. A special thanks to our Councilman at the time, Paul Little, who listened to our concerns and took affirmative action. And to Paul’s great assistant, Margo Fuller.

Thanks to the efforts of everyone, Pasadena now has one of the first and best work/live housing projects. We are looking forward to our new residential and business neighbors becoming part of Brigden Ranch. And we’re glad the unsightly gas station is a distant memory.

We hope to see you Wednesday.

On a separate note, Pasadena’s Code Enforcement and the Pasadena Police Dept. have asked us to remind everyone that there are strictly enforcement regulations against pruning, cutting, or removing protected trees. There are about 100 types of trees protected under the Pasadena Tree Protection Ordinance. Even if these trees are on your property, your back or side yard, or hang into a house in the county, they’re protected. A permit must be obtained, and in most cases, an arbohrist consulted. Most gardeners do not know what trees are protected, nor how much to cut (25% max), how the tree must be trimmed/cut, or the best time of year to cut them. Tree services either don’t know, or only care about collecting your money. For more information before you consider cutting your trees, review the City of Pasadena ordinance.

The ordinance is in place to “preserve and grow our urban forest.” Cut too much, at the wrong time or in the wrong way (topping is destructive), and the tree can die.

Remember the speed limit on Brigden Ranch roads is always 25 miles per hour.

Donn Dufford
President
Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Association

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Our Protected Trees

Pasadena’s Code Enforcement and the Pasadena Police Dept. have asked us to remind everyone that there are strictly enforcement regulations against pruning, cutting, or removing protected trees. There are about 100 types of trees protected under the Pasadena Tree Protection Ordinance. Even if these trees are on your property, your back or side yard, or hang into a house in the county, they’re protected.

A permit must be obtained, and in most cases, an arbohrist consulted. Most gardeners do not know what trees are protected, nor how much to cut (25% max), how the tree must be trimmed/cut, or the best time of year to cut them. Tree services either don’t know, or only care about collecting your money. For more information before you consider cutting your trees, review the City of Pasadena ordinance.

The ordinance is in place to “preserve and grow our urban forest.” Cut too much, at the wrong time or in the wrong way (topping is destructive), and the tree can die.

Remember the speed limit on Brigden Ranch roads is always 25 miles per hour.

Donn Dufford
President
Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Association

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This is to clarify information being circulated about a “Residential Burglary” that occurred on Woodlyn in Brigden Ranch yesterday.

Some of you may have received emails stating that a “Home Invasion Robbery” occurred on Sunday. Please be aware that this is incorrect and did NOT happen.

It is essential that facts are checked and proper terminology used before we communicate information or rumors that may cause unnecessary fear among our neighbors.

What occurred Sunday is a neighbor on Woodlyn between Martelo and Craig came home to find their home entered and possessions stolen. Emails were sent out that termed this criminal event a “Home Invasion Robbery” which is much more dangerous than this “Residential Burglary.”

Lt. Wallace, our area Pasadena Police Dept. field operations head, describes the difference: A “Home Invasion Robbery” depicts an incident where suspects, generally armed with weapons, gain entry to a house where the residents are at home and forcibly take property from those inside. What we have in this case is a “Residential Burglary” where the residents are gone; suspect(s) gained entry and took property. This is not to minimize the significance of the victimization but to assist in clarifying the incident.

At this time, we do not have information on what was stolen or who the criminal or criminals were.

We will continue to keep you informed about activities within Brigden Ranch that affect you and your family. We will always check facts before contacting you.

This is a reminder that, even with the warm weather, keep your doors and windows locked at night, and during the day when you’re away. Close and lock garage doors and other entrances that might offer crooks easy access to your home. Don’t leave valuables in your car or in house windows that can be seen by people walking by. This only invites theft. And report suspicious persons and activity to the police.

The first place to call is the Pasadena Police Department (626) 793-3176 to report suspicious activity. You can also call this number to find out what police activity is happening in our neighborhood (for example, if a police helicopter is circling overhead).

General questions can be directed to our PPD Police Specialist, Anita Butler, (626) 744-7650. Lt. Rodney D. Wallace is responsible for the PPD’s field operations division/patrol for the a wide area that includes Brigden Ranch. His office number is (626) 744-4620.

For those in the County, contact the Sheriff’s Office at (626) 798-1131.

Of course, if you have an emergency, call 911.

Donn Dufford
President
Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Association

Summer time is here and where else can you spend a cool afternoon but at your local shopping malls. Here are just a few common sense safety tips that will help you make your summer shopping experience a bit safer.

Safety in Numbers

As always, it is a good idea to shop with friends or family when possible, particularly at night. The “buddy system” is most effect in deterring would be criminals from targeting victims. Safety in numbers is the name of the game.

Parking

When choosing a place to park, one should look for spaces near lighted areas and in plain view of the store and other shoppers. Criminals do not like to be seen by people or surveillance cameras. Have keys in hand and be ready to unlock and enter the vehicle swiftly with a plan to lock doors. If approached prior to getting in your vehicle, change directions and head back to an area where others can be alerted.

Vigilance

Be observant, alert. Upon arrival and prior to exiting your vehicle, take the time to look around. If you see someone loitering, be suspicious and do not hesitate to report the activity to police, store security or other employees. When exiting the store, pause for just a few seconds near the doorway and look around. If there is someone waiting for a potential victim, they are likely waiting in the wings for the opportunity to swoop by and snatch a purse from the unsuspecting customer. If you see someone that just doesn’t fit the scene or makes you uneasy, go back inside and report it to someone. Trust your instincts!

Assistance

When in doubt about the surroundings, ask for a store employee or security to escort you to your car. There is no shame in asking for assistance and stores are generally happy to do it.

Purses & Valuables

What’s in your purse? One should consider reviewing what valuables are kept in the purse. Only those items essential to your shopping trip should make the trip. Far too often the victim has a multitude of credits cards, cash and various forms of I.D. Try trimming back on these items to minimize the potential loss and risk of identity theft. If you must carry a purse, wear it high on the shoulder and when possible, conceal it from view with a jacket or sweater drawn over it. It’s harder to steal what can’t be seen or isn’t there.

Have A Plan

In the event someone does take your purse, don’t fight over it or give chase. Being injured is not worth the replaceable contents of your purse. Should this happen, make lots of noise, scream and yell help, thief. Point in the direction of the suspect, but do not give chase, again the danger outweighs the loss of item. Try to obtain a complete description of the suspect, vehicles and direction of travel and write it down. This will assist law enforcement in catching the bad guys and the recovering loss. Of course, go back into the nearest place of safety and call police immediately via 9-1-1. If dialing from a cell phone, it is best to have the Police Department’s direct number programmed into your phone. This will save time, as most cell phone 9-1-1 calls must be rerouted to the appropriate agency.

Pasadena Police Dispatch Non-Emergency Line (626) 744-4241.

Construction workers work on the exterior of Allen-Brigden Classics on North Allen in Pasadena, June 7, 2010, as the latest affordable housing project nearing completion. Four of the six units are designated for moderate-income families, but what also sets the project apart is that two of the units are being marketed as live/work units for small home-based businesses. Applications are still being accepted.

NOTE: Your Brigden Ranch Neighborhood Association Board was instrumental in stopping the plan to build the initial project which was totally out of keeping and out of scale with the neighborhood. We worked with the City and Trademark Development to re-group and construct a smaller scale project befitting a gateway to Brigden Ranch.

Here is a excerpt from a Pasadena Star-News article published June 6, 2010. Read the full article at the link below.

Former gas station site reborn as affordable townhouse complex

PASADENA - A former gas station at 1142 N. Allen Ave. is nearing completion as Pasadena’s newest affordable townhouse complex aimed at first-time buyers.

Developer Joel Bryant of Pasadena-based Trademark Development Co. said the company bought the land from the city at the bargain price of $50,000 - with the understanding that any housing development would be affordable.

Read the full Pasadena Star-News at http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/ci_15246352

Here’s a burglary suspect being sought in Arcadia.

Please click on this link to see photos of this burglar suspect, who was spotted in Arcadia.

If you recognize or see him in our neighborhood, please be sure to note any suspicious activity and the suspect’s location in the neighborhood, then immediately call the Arcadia Police Dept.

The following Community Message has been issued by the Arcadia Police Department.
Tuesday June 8, 2010 3:22 PM PDT

The man shown in these photos is believed to be the suspect in a residential burglary that occurred in the 300 block of West Longden Avenue on June 3, 2010, during early morning hours. The residence was being “aired out” after having been fumigated. The location was ransacked and cash was taken.

The suspect appears to be a male white in his 30’s, this build, brown hair, prescription glasses, wearing a light colored t-shirt, and light colored athletic shorts.

Anyone with information on this individual is asked to call APD Detectives at (626)574-5160, reference case #10-3004.

For full details, go to https://local.nixle.com/alert/2451995/.

Security Spotlight

NOTE: Neighbors must be vigilant in order to protect our neighborhood. Here’s an article we recently ran across.

Take Notice of Suspicious Vehicles

The recent attempted terrorist attack in New York reminds us once again that taking notice of suspicious vehicles-and reporting them-can be critical in preventing structural damage, injury and loss of life.

On a balmy, busy Saturday night last month, a crude incendiary device was discovered in a smoking Nissan Pathfinder in Times Square. Police were called to the scene by an alert street vendor who noticed the smoke. Inside the vehicle, authorities found propane, gasoline, fireworks and two clocks with batteries. Police determined that the device was in the process of detonating when it was discovered, but that it had malfunctioned.

No doubt luck-that the device didn’t go off because the man who assembled it wasn’t very skilled-played a role in avoiding a potentially deadly event. But what ultimately foiled the attack was the vigilance of an “ordinary citizen” who noticed something unusual about the vehicle and immediately reported his suspicions to the authorities.

Something is Just Not Right

So, what is it that makes a vehicle suspicious? Clearly, an S.U.V. with smoke coming out of it raised a red flag, but most clues that a vehicle might be suspicious are a bit more subtle.

Suspicious vehicles can come in all shapes, sizes and colors, but the one defining characteristic they all share is that they seem “out of place.” Some other indicators to watch for include a car, van or vehicle that:

  • Emits an odd odor of chemicals, fuel, fertilizer or gunpowder
  • Doesn’t “fit” its surroundings-e.g., too pricey or too beat up, a panel truck in an area usually occupied by passenger cars
  • Has missing license plates-or an older vehicle with new or temporary tags
  • Is sagging on its springs which could indicate a load of explosives
  • Is parked awkwardly or parked in an unauthorized place
  • Moves slowly and repeatedly through an area
  • Has tinted windows or otherwise blocked view inside
  • Has been left in the same spot for an unusually long period of time
  • Is left idling in an unusual spot or unusual way (e.g., door ajar or window open)
  • Occupants are seen leaving in a hurried or strange manner

Most suspicious-looking vehicles turn out to be false alarms. In fact, in the days and weeks following the Times Square event, New York City police responded to several suspicious-vehicle calls-all of which turned out to be non-threatening. But it’s safer not to assume there is no risk. If you observe a vehicle with one or more of the above indicators, report it to the authorities immediately.

Five Senses are Enough to Spot Potential Trouble

Some say law enforcement and security personnel have a “sixth sense” when it comes to spotting trouble before it happens. But there is nothing supernatural about it. What sets these professionals apart is training and experience-that and frequent, thorough patrols of their environment that give insight into what is usual, and what is not.

Alert security officers on patrol and at access control points may be the first to detect a suspicious vehicle near or at a client site. But, as the street vendor in Times Square proved, anyone with a keen understanding of his or her surroundings can learn to detect when something-or someone-seems out of place.

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